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Early Sport Specialization

Photo courtesy: ExpertTableTennis.com

I may be shooting myself in the foot on this one…

But I feel it is my duty to educate parents and coaches,

That today, early sport specialization is an epidemic among younger athletes.

And it's caused by a paper tiger need to stay competitive.

Nothing fires me up more than coaches NOT allowing their players to play other sports throughout the year.

In this post, I'll address these three things:

  • Smart Coaches Focus on Long Term Athlete Development,
  • Stop Early Sport Specialization, and
  • Why Early Specialization in Baseball or Softball May Be Dangerous to an Athlete's Health.

 

Smart Coaches Focus on Long Term Athlete Development

I feel bad for oblivious parents in youth baseball and softball nowadays.  Their motivation to “catch-up” to the competition is HUGE because they don't want to see their child sitting on the bench.  And rightfully so.

So, what is a parent to do?  Spend $100-200 per month on a travel team that promises tournament play every weekend, plus three practices during the week…all year long!  The goal is reps, reps, reps.  That's how they see getting to the 10,000 hour mark of sport mastery.

I'm here to tell you this approach is VERY misled.

When I hear this, I see these parents spinning their tires.  Sure, they may get to those 10,000 hours, but at what cost?

And does it really take 10,000 hours?

You'll find out shortly…

Be honest with yourself,

Do you subscribe to the 10,000 hour rule of “the more reps the better”, I talked about earlier?  You've read The Talent Code right?

Well, like 3-times NY Times best selling author, Tim Ferriss, says in the video above, most of the time people are spending their 10,000 hours of “deliberate practice”, practicing the wrong things.  In this since, it's not how you study, but what you study that counts.

What do we study then?

Human movement rules that are validated by science.

It's doing the right things, and then doing those things correctly.

So, what does Long-Term Athletic Development look like?

It's diversifying an athlete's movement background early on.  Let's look at a Scandinavian Study that will shock you…

 

Stop Early Sport Specialization

Early Sport Specialization

Photo courtesy: IYCA.org

Wil Fleming from the International Youth & Conditioning Association (IYCA), which I'm a member of, put out a post that highlighted a recent Scandinavian Study that several researchers (Moesch, Elbe, Haube and Wikman) published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Sport Science.

The researchers asked elite athletes and near elite athletes to answer questions about their experiences in athletics regarding their training and practice throughout their career:

  • The near-elite athletes actually accumulated more hours of training than the elite athletes prior to age 15.
  • By age 18 the elite athletes had accumulated an equal number of hours training to the near elite athletes.
  • From age 18-21 elite athletes accumulate more training hours than near elite athletes.
  • Elite athletes said that they passed significant points in their career (first competition, starting a sport) at later dates than the near elite athletes.

What the Scandinavian Study suggests is early sport specialization was found to be a likely predictor of classification as a near-elite athlete.  According to the aforementioned IYCA article link,

“Despite much evidence that early specialization can lead to higher levels of burnout and dropout, many coaches still believe that the only way athletes can reach 10,000 hours of deliberate practice is to begin specialization at an extremely early age.”

What's more…

According to David Epstein, in his book The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletes, it's a hardware AND software issue.  Not just nature OR nurture, but both!  You can't have the latest greatest software on a 5 year old computer, just like you can't have the latest greatest computer running Windows '98.

Young athletes MUST develop the hardware early, between ages 10 and 15 years of age, which means playing other sports that aren't one-side dominant like baseball/softball, golf, or tennis.  Ideally, Martial Arts, Dance, Gymnastics, Swimming, Football, Basketball, etc.

This updates the hardware.

Then, from 16 to 18 years of age or so, it's smart to start specializing, so the athlete can update their software for that sport.  From David Epstein's research, athletes that generalized early on, did better at the sport they specialized in later, than athletes that specialized in the same sport early on.  The latter may have more sophisticated software, but their running it on a 5 year old computer.

Here's evidence, validated by science, that the 10,000 hour deliberate practice rule can be misleading.  The key is a well-rounded movement experience for young athletes, at least if you want to give them a better shot at achieving the elite athlete status.

This is Long-Term Athlete Development in a nutshell.

 

Why Early Specialization in Baseball or Softball May Be Dangerous to an Athlete's Health

Tommy John Surgery

Photo courtesy: Health.HowStuffWorks.com

This was my story with baseball…

I played 17 years of baseball as a right handed hitter and right handed thrower.

At the time, taking reps on my left side, to me, was a complete waste of time.

Imagine going to the gym everyday and doing one hundred-fifty bicep curls with a 30-pound dumbbell using your right arm only.

This next statement will get me in A LOT of hot water with my switch-hitting teammates…

But switch-hitting DOES NOT give as big a competitive advantage that everyone thinks.  Of course, switch hitting from the standpoint of a coach writing a competitive lineup, or that switch-hitters are more balanced athletes from a human movement perspective, sure.  But not to the performance of the individual hitter.

Before you get upset, think about it…

Did Babe Ruth feel the need to switch hit?  How about Ted Williams?  Do you think Miguel Cabrera, Mike Trout, or Andrew McCutchen feel the need to see a breaking ball “come into” them?

No.

A hitter will collect data and make adjustments accordingly, whether they're facing a righty or lefty pitcher.

Not only is baseball or softball one of the most imbalanced sports you can play, but it's also one of the least active, next to golf.  I read or heard a study somewhere that analyzed the action in a 7-inning baseball game, and on average, a player will have 4-minutes of real activity.

Now, that's saying something about the state of this sport!

Heck, want to know my thoughts on the increase in pitcher Tommy John surgeries?

Check out this post from Grantland.com titled, “The Tommy John Epidemic: What’s Behind the Rapid Increase of Pitchers Undergoing Elbow Surgery?”

Is the cause:

  • Low/high pitch counts?
  • The move to the 5-man rotation?
  • Faster arm speeds?
  • The angle of the elbow during the throw?  OR,
  • “Unnatural” torque produced by the body in an overhand throwing position (versus underhand)?

In the grand scheme of things, I believe it's none of these.  The damage is being done much sooner than this.

The damage is being done when young athletes are choosing (or being forced, in the case of less informed High School coaches) to specialize in one sport.  The above bullet points are just the straws that break the camel's back…or ahem, elbow.

I ask all my new hitters what other sports they play or participate during their hitting evaluation.  Here is a list of sports developing a diversified (GOOD) or specialized (BAD) movement athlete…

GOOD (well rounded sports):

  • Gymnastics (recommended),
  • Dance (recommended),
  • Martial Arts (recommended),
  • Soccer,
  • Football (everyone but kickers and quarterbacks), and
  • Basketball.

BAD (one-sided sports):

  • Baseball/Softball,
  • Football: kickers and quarterbacks,
  • Tennis,
  • Golf,
  • Volleyball (serves and spikes), and
  • Olympic Throwers & Shot Putters.

Okay, so what can you do if you're a parent or coach stuck in this rat-trap?  Three things:

  1. On the 10,000 hour deliberate practice rule – it's not about reps, reps, reps.  It's not how you study, but what you study that counts.  Make sure the hitting information you're learning is validated by science.  For coaching resources, look into the IYCA I mentioned earlier, and the Positive Coaching Alliance.
  2. Early Sport Specialization – DON'T do it!  The Scandinavian Study proved that young athletes who specialize early will most likely experience burnout and dropout, along with limit the level they can achieve in their sport.
  3. Higher Injury Rates – you're making a BIG mistake when you decide to play only baseball or softball.  Make sure to play other balanced sports that I mentioned in the “GOOD (well rounded sports)” section above.

 Do You Use Conditioning Drills For Baseball To Warmup Properly?

Conditioning Drills For Baseball Warmup

Photo courtesy: Science.HowStuffWorks.com

This is Part 2 of a multi-part series about conditioning drills for baseball:

How many of you do a dynamic warm-up with your players to start practice?

If you do not, then Dr. Stanley Beekman's post is timely.

In the following post, the Doc will give you an active full body warm up routine you can use with your young athletes.

I even have my private instruction hitters do a RAMP warm-up routine before we start hitting.  RAMP stands for:

  • Range-of-motion – increase flexibility like Dr. Stanley will talk about in his post below,
  • Activation – activating certain muscles that tend to turn off because excessive sitting during the day, and
  • Movement Preparation – certain exercises that mimic specific hitting positions or movements.

This is promoted heavily in my Youth Fitness Specialist certification through the International Youth Conditioning Association (IYCA).

If you're not including a dynamic warm-up, then you're cutting your young athletes short.

Enter Dr. Stanley…

——

This is the second of a multi-part series about conditioning drills for baseball. In this post we’ll go over:

  • What is flexibility?
  • 4 reasons we want flexibility,
  • 7 causes of “inflexibility”,
  • Why warm up? And,
  • A sample warm up program to encourage flexibility

 

What is Conditioning Drills for Baseball Flexibility?

Flexibility is defined as the ability to bend without breaking. In sports we mean ease and range of movement.

 

4 Reasons WHY We Want Flexibility?

  1. Injury prevention: For example Achilles tendonitis is caused by tight calf muscles.
  2. Better technique: Example – limitation of internal rotation of the hip joint will prevent the batter from staying closed.
  3. More Speed: Larger range of motion will allow more time to accelerate a body part.
  4. Less restriction of movement means more speed with less effort.

 

7 Causes of “Inflexibility”?

  1. Cold muscles
  2. The need to stabilize joint dysfunctions
  3. Injuries or dysfunction of muscles-agonists or antagonists, ligaments, and fascia
  4. Emotional stress
  5. Avoidance of  pain (prior or current)
  6. Shortened muscles
  7. Improper position of adjacent joints

 

Why Warm Up?

  • Muscles are like sponges. When they are dry they are stiff and will tear if moved. When they are dipped in water they become flexible
  • Joint movement pumps synovial (joint) fluid through the cartilage and prepares it for activity

 

A Sample Conditioning Drills For Baseball Warm Up Program to Encourage Flexibility

So, what is the best way to warm up the body before performing intense exercise?

I have had a few kids on my son’s team work out with him. These are the warm up exercises we do. There are many other great warm up exercises, but the key here is to get the blood flowing to all the muscles and the heart and lungs working.

Sometimes there is an overlap between warming up and ballistic stretching (which we will talk about in the next installment).

We start slowly and then build up. If you have any favorite warm up exercises, let us know in the comments section below…

1. Running with high knees 15 yards

2. Running kicking the butt 15 yards

3. Lunge walks 10 yards

4. Side lunge walks 10 yards

5. Head rotation 10x each way 

6. Arm circles forwards 10x

7. Arm circles backwards 10x

8. Huggers 10x

9. Indian clubs for shoulders, elbows and wrists 10x (Stay with 1 lb clubs)
Indian Clubs on Amazon

10. Bulgarian bag thoracic warm up 10x each way.

11. Trunk twist 10x each way

12. Hip Circles 10x each way

13. Knee Circles 10x each way 

14. Karaoke 15 yds left lead and 20 yds right lead

15. Free Squats 10x

16. Bear Crawls 15yds

17. Crab Walks 15yds

18. Burpees with Hindu push up and jump 10x

Next time we will talk about stretching…