Please Share!

Juan Soto Swing Analysis Reveals How-to Of ‘Line-To-Line' Directional Force… 

 

 

In this Juan Soto swing analysis, we'll discuss:

  • Juan Soto swing analysis quick stats,
    Juan Soto Swing Analysis

    Juan Soto photo courtesy: MLB.com on FOX

  • Lower half sets directional force,
  • Hitting it back through tube, and
  • Catapult Loading System…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joey Myers
Follow Me
Latest posts by Joey Myers (see all)
28 replies
  1. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Soto is a great talent and only 21! Great job but you got more work to do. Do Soto’s bomb into the upper deck off of Verlander in Game 6.

    Btw, if Pedro Martinez was pitching, Soto’s belt may have been in the direction of the 3B dugout because his butt would have on the ground because of his “let them play” antics.

    Reply
  2. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Somebody got to him because he cut out a lot of the nonsense he did against the Cardinals. He doesn’t have to do it. He’s got God-given talent.

    Reply
  3. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    One thing you didn’t cover is the fact that Soto doesn’t “skip his back foot,”. Though he gets very wide after his stride or his two strike no-stride approach. He loses some forward momentum but you wouldn’t know it by the distance of the home runs he hit.

    Reply
  4. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Yes, I realize that. So, the distance the back leg travels with a back foot skip seen with guys like Mickey Mantle and Javier Baez, adds no force into contact?

    Reply
  5. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    I can’t argue with your findings. What was the BES in that study? Not a fan of the no-stride approach except with two strikes. Albert Pujols went back to striding for a reason. Just a theory but I think that David Wright’s neck and back problems could be attributed to his no-stride approach. Forward momentum accounts for something, I’d say.

    Reply
    • Joey Myers
      Joey Myers says:

      Yeah, not sure neck and back problems can be connected to wide no-stride, but I do know stride type isn’t a big power upgrade – if adding much at all. Stride type is all about timing.

      Reply
  6. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Yes, I understand and do not dispute. I still feel that the momentum of the stride contributes something, which I think is lacking in the no-stride swing. Also, got a feeling that a leg lift/kick creates more GRF by allowing gravity to work longer on that front leg. Why else would hitters like Josh Donaldson and Justin Turner convert to doing it? No, I am not a heretic and realize the critical role of the spinal engine and the example of the water polo player that you refer to in one of your articles. I think that example of the water polo player is indisputable.

    Reply
  7. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Smaller guys like Donaldson and Turner getting something positive out of those leg lifts. Didn’t hit like they have subsequent to adopting those leg lifts with their former approaches. Also, their coil gives them more time to see the pitch.

    Reply
    • Joey Myers
      Joey Myers says:

      I agree Joe, sometimes hitters have to try something different in their strides…it’s basic split A/B testing…experiment with a leg kick, slide step, toe-tap, or hip slide (wide no-stride)…and see which one gets you on time more often. And pick the winner. And if later, hitter feels it’s not working, then go back to experimenting again.

      Reply
  8. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Yep, Pujols has gone back and forth and back again. I think he is doing a leg lift and stride now. Timing is the key. Remember B. J. Upton’s no-stride/toe tap thing? Hardly ever on time.

    Reply
  9. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    I agree. I saw people at facilities teach the no-stride when it first came out around early 2000s. Not pretty – they taught kids literally not to stride! No linear movement or weight shift at all – with no counter-rotation, the front foot just stayed there with no heel plant. The player involved couldn’t hit the ball past 2B! Yet, both the kid and his father bought into it because the guy who owned the facility played in the Dodgers system. Can’t make this stuff up.

    Reply
  10. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    More fraud than a funny cartoon. Really not funny at all when you see the effects of some selling people stuff like that and you’re stuck with telling them they have been taken.

    Reply
  11. Joe
    Joe says:

    High school coaches are held hostage. In order to free oneself, “the gloves come off.” Pleasantries are eschewed for whatever phraseaolgy gets the job done.

    Reply
  12. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    There is no excuse for money grubbing bs-ing frauds, who pass themselves off as hitting instructors. Nor are there excuses for gullible, pliable people who fall for their bs.

    Reply
  13. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Yes, I know but the situation is not good. I’ve seen it all too often. These so-called instructors play parents against the coaches, often who are political appointees (but, what if they are not), by throwing their professional baseball experience at them. When people shell out lots of money, who are they to believe? It’s a completely unregulated, buyer beware industry.

    Reply
    • Joey Myers
      Joey Myers says:

      I agree. And People like me get the harsh words, thinking we’re in it just for the “money”. Because that’s what they’re experiencing with these coaches and programs you speak of. They really give a bad name to the industry.

      Reply
  14. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Well, the money helps but it starts with a passion for hitting and a sense of pride in what you do. I was charging $100/hour – $60 for me and $40 to rent the cage for an hour. When they asked how much I was charging, they thought I was nuts because they were getting $120 an hour for lessons. When i just worked at a town field i would do lessons for an hour and a half for $75.

    The worst part is when I work with a player and his high school coach teaches something different. Vice versa is just as frustrating. One coach taught everyone on his team to swing down because they play on an all dirt infield that became pavement if it didn’t rain for awhile.

    Reply
    • Joey Myers
      Joey Myers says:

      Joe, you gotta switch to small private group lessons. I can make up to $180/hr. That little extra helps when you have to pay cage rent. I hear ya on team coaches teaching opposite you. Very frustrating indeed.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.