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Juan Soto Swing Analysis Reveals How-to Of ‘Line-To-Line’ Directional Force… 

 

 

In this Juan Soto swing analysis, we’ll discuss:

  • Juan Soto swing analysis quick stats,
    Juan Soto Swing Analysis

    Juan Soto photo courtesy: MLB.com on FOX

  • Lower half sets directional force,
  • Hitting it back through tube, and
  • Catapult Loading System…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Joey Myers

I’m a member of the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA), the International Youth and Conditioning Association (IYCA), and the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR).I’m also a HUGE supporter of the Positive Coaching Alliance (PCA).

I’ve spent 11+ years in the corrective fitness industry, and have too many alphabet-soup certifications to bore you with.I also played four years of Division One baseball at Fresno State from 2000-2003.

It’s NOT how you study, but what you study that counts.I apply human movement principles (or rules), validated by science, to hitting a baseball and softball.
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9 replies
  1. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Soto is a great talent and only 21! Great job but you got more work to do. Do Soto’s bomb into the upper deck off of Verlander in Game 6.

    Btw, if Pedro Martinez was pitching, Soto’s belt may have been in the direction of the 3B dugout because his butt would have on the ground because of his “let them play” antics.

    Reply
  2. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Somebody got to him because he cut out a lot of the nonsense he did against the Cardinals. He doesn’t have to do it. He’s got God-given talent.

    Reply
  3. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    One thing you didn’t cover is the fact that Soto doesn’t “skip his back foot,”. Though he gets very wide after his stride or his two strike no-stride approach. He loses some forward momentum but you wouldn’t know it by the distance of the home runs he hit.

    Reply
  4. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    Yes, I realize that. So, the distance the back leg travels with a back foot skip seen with guys like Mickey Mantle and Javier Baez, adds no force into contact?

    Reply
  5. Joe
    Joe says:

    Joey,

    I can’t argue with your findings. What was the BES in that study? Not a fan of the no-stride approach except with two strikes. Albert Pujols went back to striding for a reason. Just a theory but I think that David Wright’s neck and back problems could be attributed to his no-stride approach. Forward momentum accounts for something, I’d say.

    Reply

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