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JD Martinez Swing Analysis

In This JD Martinez Swing Analysis, Here’s A Method Helping Him Dominate The Plane Of The Pitch…

 

JD Martinez Swing Analysis

JD Martinez matching plane of the pitch. Photo courtesy: MLB.com

In this JD Martinez swing analysis, we’ll be answering the following reader questions:

  • How much of a dip in swing is too much?
  • How can we get the same results from what we see in the cage to the games?
  • Drills to keep hitters from dropping hands?

Also, I referenced the Ground-ball rant in the video detailing why I think ground-balls are gross for hitters.  Think about this: what would happen to current MLB average ground-ball rates for hitters (currently 46%) if ALL pitchers suddenly started pitching up in the zone, instead of down in the zone?

Below is the video outline and referenced links…

 

How Much of Dip in Swing is too Much?

  • Goldilocks Golden Rule
  • Trouble with excessive upper cut
  • Controlling Launch Angle Goal: batted ball leaves bat same height as pitch at impact

For the post I referenced in the above video for this section CLICK, “Baseball Batting Drills To Stop Dipping The Back Shoulder”.

 

How can we get the Same Results from what we see in the Cage to the Games?

  • Training principle of Specificity
  • Make it harder in the cage
  • Post that addresses this

For the post I referenced in the above video for this section please CLICK, “Baseball Batting Cages: How To Transition Practice Into Game Swings”.

 

Drills to Keep Hitters from Dropping Hands?

  • Effective versus ineffective hand path to the ball
  • Hands drop drill

For the post I referenced in the above video for this section please CLICK: “STOP ‘Hands Drop'”Also, here’s Dr. Mark Cheng explaining Reactive Neuromuscular Training (RNT) as “reverse psychology for your body”.

“What Baseball Batting Drills Work For Stopping Dipping Of The Back Shoulder?”

 

Baseball Batting Drills: Fascia

Fascia is like a cotton candy or spider webby like material that our bones and muscles float in. Photo courtesy: Thomas Myers in his book Anatomy Trains

PLEASE NOTE: this baseball batting drills post presupposes the hitter is getting an extreme barrel vertical angle at impact.  In other words, they’re dissecting the pitch plane from down to up.  There are natural elements to dipping the back shoulder…this article goes into fixing the extreme.

In this baseball batting drills video, we answer the reader question above.  We go over:

  • Springy fascia & tracking the front shoulder,
  • Mechanical dominos that cause upper cutting, and
  • A couple fixes…

 

Springy Fascia & Tracking the Front Shoulder

Here are past HPL baseball batting drills posts on springy fascia – and the tracking of the front shoulder – in relation to the swing:

 

Mechanical Dominos that Cause Upper Cutting

Baseball Batting Drills: Josh Donaldson

Watch Josh Donaldson drop hands, then bring back up. Also, notice downhill shoulder angle, and him leading with back armpit in the last frame. Photo courtesy: YouTube users PicPlayHost & PastimeAthletics

Here is a baseball batting drills list of faults I find that CAN contribute to upper cutting:

  1. Poor barrel launch angle,
  2. Early arm barring,
  3. Hand drop,
  4. Upward shoulder angle at landing,
  5. Racing back elbow,
  6. Steep front upper arm at landing, and
  7. Too much downhill shoulder angle…

#1 would be a hitter having a flat bat, or close to flat, at stride landing. This shifts the bat’s center of mass behind the hitter (instead of above), which typically brings in #2, to lever the bat into the impact zone.

#3 can be caused by both #1 & #2, but if the hands don’t come back up before landing (a la Josh Donaldson above), to a “knockout punch” position, then this hitter will most likely have to uppercut anything in the zone above the hands.

An upward shoulder angle at landing, #4, will most likely result in uppercutting and/or a collapsing of the backside.

#4 can be observed along with numbers 1 and 2, but not always.  Racing back elbow causes the barrel to get really steep early in the hitting zone, which leads to a lot of weak fly balls to the opposite field.  AND, because of the steep vertical angle of the barrel, a roll over correction will happen later in the barrel’s path resulting in grounders to the hitter’s pull side.

About #5, if the front elbow gets caught ‘tucked in’ at landing (elbow pointing down at the ground), then an uppercut will most likely happen.  And this ‘tucking’ will happen most likely because of #6, too steep of a shoulder angle.

 

A Couple Fixes…

  1. Setting the tee higher in the zone,
  2. Fixing the barrel launch angle from 45 to 55-degrees, shoulder angle about 8-degrees down, and/or front arm angle to about 90-degrees to the spine at landing,
  3. Finger pressure (bottom three fingers of the top hand only),
  4. Have hitter explode into impact with the ‘back arm pit’ (see Josh Donaldson last frame above),
  5. Keeping slight bend in front elbow at start of the turn, or
  6. Using the RopeBat.